Wednesday, August 12, 2020

Good Old Granny Squares




August 15th is Granny Square Day - and this year, I'm going back to basics. After trial and error, I now have my own preferred method - and I thought it would be good to write it down, and share with you today. 

Some fun ways to use Granny Squares are to make Lovies - shown below is Kirra Lovey and Lambie and Llamie  



I have included an explanation why I do it the way I do. -but feel free to experiment and see what you like best. for example - I never turn my granny squares, but if it's something you like, then please feel free to do so. Some people find it results in a straighter square.

Ok, lets get into it!

As usual, I use US terms. Photos use a 4.5 mm hook and dk weight yarn. This pattern works for any weight yarn, but make sure you use an appropriate hook. You can change colours after each round, or continue with the same yarn. Grab a paintbox 5 pack if you can't decide on colours 

I refer to '3dc' as a cluster in this tutorial.

So first step is to make a magic ring. You can follow this tutorial, or use your own preferred method. If you arent a fan of magic rings, a chain of 4, joined with a slip stitch will also work. The first row is all worked into the ring, then closed and secured at the end. 


R1: 3ch (counts as dc throughout) dc, ch 2, *3dc, ch 2, rep from *3 times; dc, sl st to 1st st, sl st to 1st ch-2 sp… (12 dc, 8ch)




  • I like to put the 'first' dc at the end. Having the chain in the middle of the cluster hides it a bit better - it's less obvious that it's a chain. And it's as close to the corner as possible. 
  • Why two slip stitches? I think it's a nicer join to sl st to the top of the first stitch (not the chain) and the second slip stitch means you are starting in the corner.

R2: (3ch, dc, ch 2, 3dc) in same ch-2 sp, *(ch, 3dc, 2ch, 3dc) in next ch-2 sp, rep from * 3 times; ch, dc in 1st ch-2 sp,  sl st to 1st st, sl st to 1st ch-2 sp ….(24 dc, 12 ch)



R3: (3ch, dc, ch 2, 3dc) in same ch-2 sp, *(ch, 3dc) in next ch-1 sp, (ch, 3dc, 2ch, 3dc) in next ch-2 sp, rep from * 3 times, (ch, 3dc) in next ch-1 sp, ch, dc in 1st ch-2 sp,  sl st to 1st st, sl st to 1st ch-2 sp… (36 tr, 16 ch)

  • Having a chain space between the non corner clusters is also a personal choice. I think for beginners its a very good method - 2 chains is a corner, 1 chain is a regular space. 
  • Strictly speaking - every round from now one will be the same as round three, but with the addition an extra cluster each side - 4 per round. 
  • Every corner space (2 chains) will contain a corner cluster of ch, 3dc, 2ch, 3dc. Every ch-1 space will contain (ch, 3dc) 

Rows 4 and 5 will read like:

R4: (3ch, dc, ch 2, 3dc) in same ch-2 sp, *(ch, 3dc) in next ch-1 sp, twice, (ch, 3dc, 2ch, 3dc) in next ch-2 sp, rep from * 3 times, (ch, 3dc) in next ch-1 sp, twice, ch, dc in 1st ch-2 sp,  sl st to 1st st, sl st to 1st ch-2 sp…(48 tr, 20 ch)



R5: (3ch, dc ch 2, 3dc) in same ch-2 sp, *(ch, 3dc) in next ch-1 sp, 3 times, (ch, 3dc, 2ch, 3dc) in next ch-2 sp, rep from * 3 times, (ch, 3dc) in next ch-1 sp, 3 times, ch, dc in 1st ch-2 sp, sl st to 1st st, sl st to 1st ch-2 sp…(60 tr, 24 ch)


Continue your square as big as you like! Just follow the rule of the corner cluster in ch-2 sp, and every ch-1 sp contains a single cluster of stitches. 


I hope you enjoyed my pattern and explanation. 

If you would like to continue on to some Granny Square variations, here are some suggestions:



As usual: No restrictions are placed on finished items made with this pattern, however the pattern may not be resold or copied in any form. Pictures remain the property of Emma Wilkinson Designs

No comments:

Post a Comment